Kinda Hot in these Rhinos

Ask   Submit   All I want is glitches, big-booty glitches. Davey. 29. Kopimist. (aka phocomelus) #oc #remix #music #art #cats #gif

diegowha:

The Crystal Palace (central nervous system) by Diego wha

(via the-pineal-gland)

— 1 hour ago with 51 notes

diegowha:

-Cloud portal
-Néfele

Edit by Diego wha

(via the-pineal-gland)

— 4 hours ago with 27 notes
noworkflow:

Randomly generated piece.

noworkflow:

Randomly generated piece.

— 6 hours ago with 2 notes
cloudnectar:

Sunny Side Up (Collaboration with Ysabelle Durant)

cloudnectar:

Sunny Side Up (Collaboration with Ysabelle Durant)

— 7 hours ago with 1236 notes

awidesetvagina:

this is still the best story ever told at a talk show

(via whitepeoplestealingculture)

— 10 hours ago with 435469 notes
science-junkie:

How plankton gets jet lagged
A hormone that governs sleep and jet lag in humans may also drive the mass migration of plankton in the ocean, scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, have found. The molecule in question, melatonin, is essential to maintain our daily rhythm, and the European scientists have now discovered that it governs the nightly migration of a plankton species from the surface to deeper waters. The findings, published online today in Cell, indicate that melatonin’s role in controlling daily rhythms probably evolved early in the history of animals, and hold hints to how our sleep patterns may have evolved.[…]
[The researchers] discovered a group of specialised motor neurons that respond to melatonin. Using modern molecular sensors, [they were] able to visualise the activity of these neurons in the larva’s brain, and found that it changes radically from day to night. The night-time production of melatonin drives changes in these neurons’ activity, which in turn cause the larva’s cilia to take long pauses from beating. Thanks to these extended pauses, the larva slowly sinks down. During the day, no melatonin is produced, the cilia pause less, and the larva swims upwards.
“Step by step we can elucidate the evolutionary origin of key functions of our brain. The fascinating picture emerges that human biology finds its roots in some deeply conserved, fundamental aspects of ocean ecology that dominated life on Earth since ancient evolutionary times”
Read more @EMBL

science-junkie:

How plankton gets jet lagged

A hormone that governs sleep and jet lag in humans may also drive the mass migration of plankton in the ocean, scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, have found. The molecule in question, melatonin, is essential to maintain our daily rhythm, and the European scientists have now discovered that it governs the nightly migration of a plankton species from the surface to deeper waters. The findings, published online today in Cell, indicate that melatonin’s role in controlling daily rhythms probably evolved early in the history of animals, and hold hints to how our sleep patterns may have evolved.[…]

[The researchers] discovered a group of specialised motor neurons that respond to melatonin. Using modern molecular sensors, [they were] able to visualise the activity of these neurons in the larva’s brain, and found that it changes radically from day to night. The night-time production of melatonin drives changes in these neurons’ activity, which in turn cause the larva’s cilia to take long pauses from beating. Thanks to these extended pauses, the larva slowly sinks down. During the day, no melatonin is produced, the cilia pause less, and the larva swims upwards.

Step by step we can elucidate the evolutionary origin of key functions of our brain. The fascinating picture emerges that human biology finds its roots in some deeply conserved, fundamental aspects of ocean ecology that dominated life on Earth since ancient evolutionary times

Read more @EMBL

— 13 hours ago with 375 notes
loopfindr:

Tim and Eric - Goatee
Frames: 4385 to 4420
Time: 02:26:322 to 02:27:490

loopfindr:

Tim and Eric - Goatee

Frames: 4385 to 4420

Time: 02:26:322 to 02:27:490

— 18 hours ago with 12 notes